1 0 3000 0 300 120 30 http://fingerguns.net 960 0
site-mobile-logo
site-logo

EGX 2018: Hands-On with GRIP

It was always on the cards to go and see Wired Productions. The team that brought us The Town of Light and um, Shaq Fu have now got their hands on upcoming futuristic racer Grip, a game that has been on […]

It was always on the cards to go and see Wired Productions. The team that brought us The Town of Light and um, Shaq Fu have now got their hands on upcoming futuristic racer Grip, a game that has been on Sean and I’s radar for a little while (we love a competitive racer). Obviously, we were going to have a race on it and see how it plays.

At least in my mind, Grip played like the ultimate concoction of the best parts of Wipeout and Onrush. As a duo, they shouldn’t really mix but somehow the way Grip controls it feels like a spiritual successor to them both at the same time, even if it doesn’t feel quite as polished.

That cars themselves are essentially tanks, just a little smaller. They are double sided, meaning that they can be driven even if you end up flipping over, which is neat. They’re insurmountably fast too, races move at a breaknace pace that may be a little tricky to keep up with at first, though eventually you’ll find yourself being able to handle these monsters that can drive up and down anything they come across. The tracks are designed with the design of the cars at the front and centre, so you can tear it down ceilings of tunnels if you’re bored of the road and want to take over opponents with some style.

You’ve got access to a near infinite level of boost if you want to go even faster, though it’s best to save them for when things get a little more straight and narrow. You’re going to come off the track a fair bit until you get a handle of the speed. It happened to me on several occasions, thankfully the game just resets you back onto the track, there’s even a button on the controller you can press if you want to get the process done a little quicker and get back into the race. This does take you out of the speed some what, the adrenaline pumping comes to an abrupt stop upon falling off the track for the hundredth time. Of course, if you’re going to pick this up you’ll no doubt be good enough that it won’t happen quite as often. I wasn’t that lucky in my brief time with the game at EGX.

At the time of playing, the games camera is an absolute clusterfuck, particularly when you crash. If there is a way to get back onto the track when you slightly swerve off without resetting I wouldn’t know because the camera goes utterly batshit whenever it’s taken away from its standard position. This, along with crashing, was quite the double-header. The two currently don’t mix.

Still, from a technical standpoint everything else runs pretty smoothly and we certainly had fun blasting around these enormous tracks, even if there’s a desert level where it’s somewhat difficult to have a good idea of where you’re meant to be going. We played a snow level a couple of times and we have fun boosting around every corner and through the cylindrical tunnels.

Grip was fun, though all of its rough edges were certainly on display. Here’s hoping it gets a polish ahead of its full release before the end of the year.

Previous Post
EGX 2018: 10 Of The ...
Next Post
This is the Police 2...
0 Comments
Leave a Reply